Innovation

Executives at some of the most innovative companies such as Apple, Amazon, Yahoo, Google, Proctor & Gamble, and Southwest Airlines, realize that, to be successful, they must find, and cultivate professionals who are able to come up with innovative and creative ideas.

In the December, 2009  Harvard Business Review article (“The Innovator’s DNA,” p.60) the authors point to five discovery skills as traits necessary for innovation:

  • associating (connecting seemingly unrelated questions)
  • questioning (considering new ideas)
  • observing (gaining insight into new ways of doing things)
  • experimenting (trying various approaches)
  • networking (to gain different perspectives).

The most powerful message in the article is that you can cultivate the ability to innovate.  The authors believe that creativity comes one-third from genetics and two-thirds from learning.  The more you engage in the 5 discovery skills, the more you’ll think in innovative ways.  The Harvard Business Review article suggests practicing by thinking of ways to challenge the status quo in your company, college or club.

An innovative idea has value if it helps your company to move forward so there needs to be either a commercial impact or an idea that will achieve company objectives (e.g. better client service, for example).  If you are having difficulty determining your innovative accomplishment, then ask colleagues for help.  They may come up with examples you haven’t thought of.

What do you think is the most innovative thing you’ve done?  What is the value of your idea (quantify it, if possible)?  Let us know how you answer the question.  We’re looking forward to hearing from you.

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Increasing Your Marketability

All of us would love to have a job which fit the challenging job-autonomy-new and marketable skills model, but it doesn’t always happen.  You may have one boss that absolutely follows that model and then, through a normal transition, have a new boss who doesn’t follow the model at all.  In today’s world where your career progress is in your own hands, it is incumbent on you to do as much as you can to keep your skill development moving forward.

Suppose, for example, your former boss was terrific about giving you feedback on your job performance, letting you know immediately when an action you took was incorrect, and making suggestions for future direction.  Let’s assume that your current boss is introverted and seems disinterested in giving you (or anyone else) feedback.  A few suggestions might be:

  • set up a meeting with your new boss specifically to review your progress and ask for feedback
  • go to a mentor who is more senior than you, but not in a formal leadership capacity, to seek feedback on how you are doing
  • ask your human resources represented if he/she has heard feedback that could be of help to you
  • ask colleagues, who are doing the same work, what they have heard about your work
  • set a plan for yourself that includes new learning and ask for your boss’ approval

What other thoughts do you have that could be added to the list?  What is your plan, going forward, for new skill development?  What is the timeframe and what are the resources you need to implement the plan?

Developing New Skills

When asked why someone enjoys their job surveys always report, “When I have a challenging job, the autonomy to do the job and when I can learn new and marketable skills.” When force ranked on surveys this question is always in the top three responses.  As a talented professional you are a voracious learner and you want to:

  • be in a job that challenges you
  • develop knowledge that teaches you new skills
  • gain experience that increases your marketability
  • receive feedback, good and bad, about your progress
  • learn from smart people who are above you, at your level, and below you
  • be eligible for developmental or rotational assignments
  • receive as much training as possible.

All of us would love to have a job which fit the challenging job-autonomy-new and marketable skills model, but it doesn’t always happen.  You may have one boss that absolutely follows that model and then, through a normal transition, have a new boss who doesn’t follow the model at all.  In today’s world where your career progress is in your own hands, it is incumbent on you to do as much as you can to keep your skill development moving forward.

Suppose, for example, your former boss was terrific about giving you feedback on your job performance, letting you know immediately when an action you took was incorrect, and making suggestions for future direction.  Let’s assume that your current boss is introverted and seems disinterested in giving you (or anyone else) feedback.  A few suggestions might be:

  • set up a meeting with your new boss specifically to review your progress and ask for feedback
  • go to a mentor who is more senior than you, but not in a formal leadership capacity, to seek feedback
  • ask your human resources represented if he/she has heard feedback that could be of help
  • ask colleagues, who are doing the same work, what they have heard
  • set a plan for yourself that includes new learning and ask for your boss’ approval

What other thoughts do you have that could be added to the list?  What is your plan, going forward, for new skill development?  What is the timeframe and what are the resources you need to implement the plan?