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I am not getting the respect I think I deserve from my boss

December 15, 2011

Question:  I’m very productive but I don’t feel like a get respect from my boss or colleagues and I’m thinking about starting to look for another job.  Am I missing something?

Fred:  Perhaps, and perhaps not.  Set down, in writing, the problem including some very specific examples.  Then ask yourself, “Is there anything I could have done to prevent this?  Suppose, for example, your boss held an important meeting on a day when you were out attending a conference, and you did not receive a summary of the meeting.  Ask yourself:  Did the boss know I’d be attending the conference?  Did I remind her a day or two prior?  If I did not receive the minutes, did I go to the boss’ administrative assistant and ask for a copy?

Once you have thought through your examples, schedule a meeting with your boss.  You might say, “I’ve been feeling a little out of touch and I’d like your perspective.”  Then carefully lay out what you have been feeling using examples that are not personal in nature (e.g. don’t say “you’re ignoring me”).  The example of missing the meeting is a good one.  If the boss needs more than one example give her another one.  If people are involved (e.g. someone is not carrying their weight), tell the boss the circumstances but do not use anyone’s name.  Engage in an open, interactive conversation.  In the normal rush of business activities, you may find that your boss has inadvertently been disrespectful and is surprised and sorry.  If that isn’t the case, give the boss some time to work on the things you’ve discussed and to change her behavior toward you.

Have a situation at work — either good or bad — that you’d like Fred’s advice on?  Ask about it in the comments box below and Fred will respond!

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Increasing Your Marketability

November 1, 2011

All of us would love to have a job which fit the challenging job-autonomy-new and marketable skills model, but it doesn’t always happen.  You may have one boss that absolutely follows that model and then, through a normal transition, have a new boss who doesn’t follow the model at all.  In today’s world where your career progress is in your own hands, it is incumbent on you to do as much as you can to keep your skill development moving forward.

Suppose, for example, your former boss was terrific about giving you feedback on your job performance, letting you know immediately when an action you took was incorrect, and making suggestions for future direction.  Let’s assume that your current boss is introverted and seems disinterested in giving you (or anyone else) feedback.  A few suggestions might be:

  • set up a meeting with your new boss specifically to review your progress and ask for feedback
  • go to a mentor who is more senior than you, but not in a formal leadership capacity, to seek feedback on how you are doing
  • ask your human resources represented if he/she has heard feedback that could be of help to you
  • ask colleagues, who are doing the same work, what they have heard about your work
  • set a plan for yourself that includes new learning and ask for your boss’ approval

What other thoughts do you have that could be added to the list?  What is your plan, going forward, for new skill development?  What is the timeframe and what are the resources you need to implement the plan?

Innovation

October 28, 2011

Executives at some of the most innovative companies such as Apple, Amazon, Yahoo, Google, Proctor & Gamble, and Southwest Airlines, realize that, to be successful, they must find, and cultivate professionals who are able to come up with innovative and creative ideas.

In the December, 2009  Harvard Business Review article (“The Innovator’s DNA,” p.60) the authors point to five discovery skills as traits necessary for innovation:

  • associating (connecting seemingly unrelated questions)
  • questioning (considering new ideas)
  • observing (gaining insight into new ways of doing things)
  • experimenting (trying various approaches)
  • networking (to gain different perspectives).

The most powerful message in the article is that you can cultivate the ability to innovate.  The authors believe that creativity comes one-third from genetics and two-thirds from learning.  The more you engage in the 5 discovery skills, the more you’ll think in innovative ways.  The Harvard Business Review article suggests practicing by thinking of ways to challenge the status quo in your company, college or club.

An innovative idea has value if it helps your company to move forward so there needs to be either a commercial impact or an idea that will achieve company objectives (e.g. better client service, for example).  If you are having difficulty determining your innovative accomplishment, then ask colleagues for help.  They may come up with examples you haven’t thought of.

What do you think is the most innovative thing you’ve done?  What is the value of your idea (quantify it, if possible)?  Let us know how you answer the question.  We’re looking forward to hearing from you.

Building Your Personal Brand

October 28, 2011

The title of the article is “Returning to the National Stage, Christie endorses Romney.”

He had decided late and for him to compete he would have had to make up an incredible amount of ground; perhaps too much ground.  Instead, he chose to endorse Mitt Romney early and just prior to the New Hampshire primary.  It was, some say, a risky move to endorse a candidate this early.  On the flip side, however, it gave Christie an opportunity to build and use political capital at a time when he was still riding a high.  What does this do for Chris Christie?  It gives him political star power and an opportunity to remain in the national eye while hitting the campaign trail in support of Romney.

What’s the relevance of this national interest story for you?  You can’t pick up a current business magazine without finding an article about “building your brand” or self-marketing.  One of the best ways of doing this is by promoting a subordinate or colleague.

The tricky part is that there are a few rules that you must follow so that your endorsement doesn’t seem false or self-serving:

  • There must be a legitimate connection between you and the person you are promoting
  • The accomplishment must be stretching to help the firm accomplish one of its critical goals
  • The person must have performed in an extra-ordinary manner (such as closing a complex and profitable piece of business for the firm)
  • Their behavior needs to be within the firm’s definition of high integrity work and with outstanding value to the client.

When you present an outstanding success of one of your subordinates or colleagues to your boss you are giving them credit and recognition while, simultaneously, expanding your visibility and credibility within the firm.

Can you think of an opportunity you have to promote a subordinate or colleague?

Developing New Skills

October 28, 2011

When asked why someone enjoys their job surveys always report, “When I have a challenging job, the autonomy to do the job and when I can learn new and marketable skills.” When force ranked on surveys this question is always in the top three responses.  As a talented professional you are a voracious learner and you want to:

  • be in a job that challenges you
  • develop knowledge that teaches you new skills
  • gain experience that increases your marketability
  • receive feedback, good and bad, about your progress
  • learn from smart people who are above you, at your level, and below you
  • be eligible for developmental or rotational assignments
  • receive as much training as possible.

All of us would love to have a job which fit the challenging job-autonomy-new and marketable skills model, but it doesn’t always happen.  You may have one boss that absolutely follows that model and then, through a normal transition, have a new boss who doesn’t follow the model at all.  In today’s world where your career progress is in your own hands, it is incumbent on you to do as much as you can to keep your skill development moving forward.

Suppose, for example, your former boss was terrific about giving you feedback on your job performance, letting you know immediately when an action you took was incorrect, and making suggestions for future direction.  Let’s assume that your current boss is introverted and seems disinterested in giving you (or anyone else) feedback.  A few suggestions might be:

  • set up a meeting with your new boss specifically to review your progress and ask for feedback
  • go to a mentor who is more senior than you, but not in a formal leadership capacity, to seek feedback
  • ask your human resources represented if he/she has heard feedback that could be of help
  • ask colleagues, who are doing the same work, what they have heard
  • set a plan for yourself that includes new learning and ask for your boss’ approval

What other thoughts do you have that could be added to the list?  What is your plan, going forward, for new skill development?  What is the timeframe and what are the resources you need to implement the plan?